Wellness

Yoga Basics

June 2, 2019

Yoga Basics

When some people think of yoga, they imagine having to stretch like a gymnast. That makes them worry that they’re too old, unfit, or “tight” to do yoga. The truth is you’re never too old to improve flexibility. Most Westernized classes focus on learning physical poses, which are called asanas. They also usually include some form of breathing technique and possibly a meditation technique as well. Some classes are designed purely for relaxation. But there are styles of yoga that teach you how to move your body in new ways.

There Is A Class For Everyone!

Choosing one of these styles offers the greatest health benefits by enabling you to develop your flexibility, strength, and balance. Hyp-Yoga uses traditional and modified yoga poses for beginners and those who are overweight. The last part of the class focuses on hypnotic suggestions for relaxation and to help people fight cravings.

The series of yoga poses called asanas work by safely stretching your muscles. This releases the lactic acid that builds up with muscle use and causes stiffness, tension, pain, and fatigue. In addition, yoga increases the range of motion in joints. It may also increase lubrication in the joints. The outcome is a sense of ease and fluidity throughout your body.

Yoga stretches not only your muscles but all of the soft tissues of your body. That includes ligaments, tendons, and the fascia sheath that surrounds your muscles. And no matter your level, you most likely will see benefits in a very short period of time. In one study, participants had up to 35% improvement in flexibility after only eight weeks of classes. The greatest gains were in shoulder and trunk flexibility.

Yoga and Strength Training

Some styles such as ashtanga and power are more vigorous than others. Practicing one of these styles will help you improve muscle tone.

But even less vigorous styles of yoga, such as sunrise and chair, which focuses on less movement and more precise alignment in poses, can provide strength and endurance benefits.

Many of the poses, such as downward dog, upward dog, and the plank pose, build upper-body strength. This becomes crucial as people age. The standing poses, especially if you hold them for several long breaths, build strength in your hamstrings, quadriceps, and abdominal muscles. Poses that strengthen the lower back include upward dog and the chair pose. When practiced correctly, nearly all poses build core strength in the deep abdominal muscles.

Yoga for Stress Relief

Even beginners tend to feel less stressed and more relaxed after their first class. Some yoga styles use specific meditation techniques to quiet the constant “mind chatter” that often underlies stress. Other yoga styles depend on deep breathing techniques to focus the mind on the breath. When this happens the mind calms.

Among yoga’s anti-stress benefits are a host of biochemical responses. For example, there is a decrease in catecholamines, the hormones produced by the adrenal glands in response to stress. Lowering levels of hormone neurotransmitters — dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine — creates a feeling of calm. Some research points to a boost in the hormone oxytocin. This is the so-called “trust” and “bonding” hormone that’s associated with feeling relaxed and connected to others.

Can Yoga Help Heart Disease or Other Illnesses?

Perhaps one of the most studied areas of the health benefits is its effect on heart disease. Yoga has long been known to lower blood pressure and slow the heart rate. A slower heart rate can benefit people with high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke. Yoga was a key component to the heart disease program designed by Dean Ornish, MD. This was the first program to partly reverse heart disease through lifestyle and diet rather than surgery. On a biochemical level, studies point to a possible anti-oxidant effect. Yoga has been associated with decreased cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well as a boost in immune system function. Most recently at the American College of Cardiology 60th Annual Scientific Session showed benefit for atrial fibrillation with the practice.

As yoga has become more popular in the West, medical researchers have begun studying the benefits of therapeutic yoga. This is also called integrative yoga therapy or IYT. It’s used as an adjunct treatment for specific medical conditions, from clinical depression to heart disease. Yoga benefits other chronic medical conditions, relieving symptoms of back pain, asthma, and arthritis. Most worldwide clinical studies are happening outside of the U.S. But even the NIH has funded clinical trials on yoga and its health benefits for insomnia and multiple sclerosis.

Original post date: June, 2011. Revised: June, 2019.

One Comment
  1. Avatar

    Jen

    Thanks for this post, Dr. Isherwood - especially the areas in which you addressed beginners. I'm a total Yoga newbie - but went to Yoga Rocks the Park last week with some friends and had the best time! I was a bit of a cynic - as I'm not very flexible and have always been of the mindset that you need a lot of cardio in order to have a good workout. But after that one class, I'm completely hooked on yoga and am looking forward to incorporating it more into my life!

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